Tag Archive for: health

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CAB Community Meeting, Oct. 19, 7 pm

Please join with CAB this Thursday for a presentation on the interaction of pesticides with biodiversity, disease, and climate – presented by Jay Feldman, Beyond Pesticides! 

Topic: Eliminating petrochemical pesticides in our local environment

    What:  Join CAB online in this Zoom presentation

    When: Thursday, Oct 19, at 7 p.m.

    How: Reply to cleanairboard@gmail.com if you would like a link to the Zoom meeting.

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Clean Air Board files comments to EPA on PM2.5 standards

March 27, 2023 – The Clean Air Board of Central Pennsylvania submitted comments to the US Environmental Protection Agency on proposed revisions to the air quality standards for fine particulate (soot). CAB urged EPA to tighten the standards to protect vulnerable populations and the general public. Recent medical studies have shown that even low levels of airborne soot pollution can cause harmful health problems. CAB asked EPA to adopt an annual standard of 8 micrograms per cubic meter (8 ug/m3) and a 24-hour standard of 25 micrograms per cubic meter (25 ug/m3). Read the CAB comments.

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Air Pollution Kills 10 Million People a Year.

For every thousand people alive on earth, 973 are regularly inhaling toxins. Only 27 are not. Which means, almost certainly, you are too.

Last fall, the World Health Organization lowered its global air quality standard from 10 micrograms of particulate matter per cubic meter to five. Those terms and standards can feel abstract, which makes their meaning a bit hard to fathom.  Read more . . .

 

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Western Wildlifes – the effect on public health

View the recent CAB Zoom meeting where we discuss the air pollution caused by western wildfires and the readings at air quality monitors around major cities on the west coast.  https://cleanairboard.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/Wildfires.mp4

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DEP Issues a Code Orange Air Quality Action Day Forecast for June 9, 2020

Harrisburg, PA – The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and its regional air quality partnerships have forecast a Code Orange Air Quality Action Day for ozone on June 9, 2020, for southeastern and southcentral Pennsylvania (encompassing the counties of Bucks, Chester, Cumberland, Dauphin, Delaware, Lancaster, Lebanon, Montgomery, Philadelphia, and York).
Strong sunshine, temperatures close to 90 degrees Fahrenheit, and light south to southwest winds will act to bring ozone concentrations to code ORANGE levels Tuesday afternoon. Concentrations of ozone are expected to be lower on Wednesday with only partly sunny skies and the chance for shower and thunderstorm development.
On air quality action days, young children, the elderly, and those with respiratory problems, such as asthma, emphysema, and bronchitis, are especially vulnerable to the effects of air pollution and should limit outdoor activities.  Read more
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CAB files comments on “Transparency Rule”

On May 15, 2020, the Clean Air Board of Central Pennsylvania  filed written comments opposing EPA’s proposed rule  entitled “Strengthening Transparency in Science.”  CAB expressed concern that the proposed rule will work to create barriers to the use of highly respected and valuable epidemiological studies in EPA’s decisions.  Along with other consequences, under the proposed rule, large epidemiological studies like the effect of air pollution and correlation with public health in regard to respiratory, cardiac, and neurological impacts would be discounted, to the detriment of people living close to polluting sources.

The full comment statement can be found here.

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Air Pollution and Coronavirus Death Rates

The New York Times, April 7, 2020 by Lisa Friedman

WASHINGTON — Coronavirus patients in areas that had high levels of air pollution before the pandemic are more likely to die from the infection than patients in cleaner parts of the country, according to a new nationwide study that offers the first clear link between long-term exposure to pollution and Covid-19 death rates.

Read more from NY Times

Air pollution compared during the worst days in big cities and nearby areas

See How the World’s Most Polluted Air Compares With Your City’s

by Nadja Popovich, Blacki Migliozzi, Karthik Patanjali, Anjali Singhvi and Jon HuangDec. 2, 2019

We visualized the damaging, tiny particles that wreak havoc on human health. From the Bay Area to New Delhi, see how the world’s worst pollution compares with your local air.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2019/12/02/climate/air-pollution-compare-ar-ul.html

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The Sentinel: Clean Air Board’s fight to clear the air in Carlisle

June 1, 2018, Joe Cress The Sentinel

Sometimes the proudest achievement is the hardest one to measure in terms of its impact down the road.Such is the case with the Clean Air Board of Central Pennsylvania and the lobbying effort it led a decade ago to implement anti-idling legislation.

That legislation put into place time limits on idling in the hope the new restrictions could reduce fine particulate emissions from diesel engine exhausts.

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DEP Issues a Code Orange Air Quality Action Day Forecast for Southcentral Counties for June 16-18, 2018

The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection and its regional air quality partnerships have forecast a Code Orange Air Quality Action Day for ozone on June 16, 2018 for the Pittsburgh region (encompassing Allegheny, Armstrong, Beaver, Butler, Fayette, Indiana, Mercer, Washington, and Westmoreland counties). A Code Orange Air Quality Action Day for ozone is also forecast on June 17 and 18 for the Pittsburgh region, southcentral counties (Cumberland, Dauphin, Lancaster, Lebanon, and York counties) and the Lehigh Valley (Berks, Lehigh, and Northampton counties).

On air quality action days, young children, the elderly and those with respiratory problems, such as asthma, emphysema and bronchitis, are especially vulnerable to the effects of air pollution and should limit outdoor activities.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s standardized air quality index uses colors to report daily air quality. Green signifies good; yellow means moderate; orange represents unhealthy pollution levels for sensitive people; and red warns of unhealthy pollution levels for all.

To help keep the air healthy, residents and business are encouraged to voluntarily restrict certain pollution-producing activities by:
•    Refueling cars and trucks after dusk
•    Setting air conditioner thermostats to a higher temperature
•    Carpooling or using public transportation; and
•    Combining errands to reduce trips.